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南院慧顒 "寶應" Nanyuan Huiyong "Baoying" (860-930)
(Rōmaji:) Nan'in Egyō "Hōō"


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Nan-jüan Huj-jung mondásaiból
Fordította: Terebess Gábor

Nanyuan Huiyong "Baoying"
by Andy Ferguson

 

Nanyuan Huiyong "Baoying"
by Andy Ferguson
In: Zen's Chinese Heritage: The Masters and Their Teachings, Wisdom Publications, pp. 273-275.


NANYUAN HUIYONG (860–930) was a disciple of Xinghua Cunjiang. He came from ancient Hebei. Nanyuan was extremely strict and uncompromising in his approach to teaching Zen. He lived and taught at the “South Hall” (in Chinese, Nanyuan) of the Baoying Zen Monastery at Ruzhou. Nanyuan is the most important teacher of the third generation of the Linji school, and is a direct link in the lineage that stretches down to modern times.

*

Nanyuan entered the hall and said to the assembled monks, “On top of a lump of red flesh, a sheer precipice of eight thousand feet.”

A monk asked, “‘On top of a lump of red flesh, a sheer precipice of eight thousand feet.’ Isn’t this what you said?”

Nanyuan said, “It is.”

The monk then lifted and turned over the meditation bench.

Nanyuan exclaimed, “This blind ass has run riot!”

The monk started to speak.

Nanyuan hit him.

*

Nanyuan asked a monk, “Where have you come from?”

The monk said, “From Longwater.”

Nanyuan asked him, “Did it flow east or west?”

The monk said, “Neither way.”

Nanyuan then asked, “What did it do?”

The monk bowed and began to leave.

Nanyuan hit him.

*

A monk came for instruction. Nanyuan raised his whisk.

The monk said, “Today a failure.”

Nanyuan put down the whisk.

The monk said, “Still a failure.”

Nanyuan hit him.

*

Nanyuan asked a monk, “Where did you come from?”

The monk said, “From Xiangzhou.”

Nanyuan said, “What did you come here for?”

The monk said, “I came especially to pay respects to the master.”

Nanyuan said, “You’ve come here just when old Baoying isn’t here.”

The monk shouted.

Nanyuan said, “I said Baoying isn’t here. What good will it do to shout anymore?”

The monk shouted again.

Nanyuan hit him.

The monk bowed.

Nanyuan said, “Actually, you have struck me, so I hit you back. You want this to be widely known. Blind fellow! Go to the hall!”

*

A monk asked, “What is a seamless monument?”

Nanyuan said, “Eight seams and nine cracks.”

The monk asked, “What is the person inside the monument?”

Nanyuan said, “Hair uncombed. Face unwashed.”

*

Nanyuan asked a monk, “What is your name?”

The monk said, “Pucan [‘Practice Everywhere’].”

Nanyuan said, “What would you do if you encountered a turd?”

The monk bowed.

Nanyuan hit him.

*

A monk asked Nanyuan, “When the sacred and the mundane abide in the same place, then what?”

Nanyuan said, “Two cats. One of them is fierce.”

*

 

 

 


Nan-jüan Huj-jung összegyűjtött mondásaiból
Fordította: Terebess Gábor
Folyik a híd, Officina Nova, Budapest, 1990, 79. oldal


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