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山田耕雲 Yamada Kōun (1907-1989)

The Sanbô Kyôdan is a Zen-Buddhist Religious Foundation (shûkyô-hôjin) started by YASUTANI Haku'un Roshi on 8 January 1954.

The second abbot of the Sanbô Kyôdan, YAMADA Kôun Roshi, was born in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on 18 March 1907. He started Zazen in Manchuria in 1943 under the guidance of KÔNO Sôkan Roshi. Upon returning to Honshu, Japan, in 1945 he devoted himself to zazen practice under ASAHINA Sôgen Roshi of the Engakuji in Kamakura as well as under HANAMOTO Kanzui Roshi of the Mokusenji in Ôfuna. However, he never became a monk and continued to work in the business world; his major position was president of the Tokyo Kembikyôin Medical Center.

YAMADA Roshi received the Buddhist precept from HARADA Sogaku Roshi in 1950; through this connection he came into contact with YASUTANI Roshi, HARADA Roshi's disciple, whom YAMADA Roshi invited in 1953 to launch the Zen group called "Kamakura Haku'un-kai" and to begin a monthly zazenkai in Kamakura. In the same year he experienced an unusually deep enlightenment, which led him to the Dharma succession in 1960. In 1967 he was appointed Zen Master (shôshike) of the Sanbô Kyôdan. Three years later he became the president of the Kyôdan.

PDF: In Memoriam: Yamada Kōun Rōshi (1907-1989) by Ruben L. F. Habito
Buddhist-Christian Studies, Vol. 10 (1990), pp. 231-237.

 


山田耕雲 Yamada Kōun Zenshin (1907-1989) or Koun Yamada
with his wife, Mrs. Kazue Yamada

The San'un Zendo as the Central Dôjô

In 1970, Kôun Roshi, together with his wife Dr. Kazue YAMADA, built the San'un Zendo in his family compound. ("San'un" means "three clouds," representing the three Zen masters in the same lineage: "HARADA Daiun [big cloud]," "YASUTANI Haku'un [white cloud]," and "YAMADA Kôun [plowing cloud]"). Subsequently the San'un Zendo became the central dôjô [place of practice] of the Sanbô Kyôdan. Here, YAMADA Kôun Roshi guided both Japanese and non-Japanese students in the zazenkai (zazen gathering at the weekend, held twice a month) as well as in the sesshin (zazen gathering for several days, held several times a year).

Especially after Father Hugo M. ENOMIYA-LASSALLE became an earnest student of YAMADA Roshi, many Christian priests, nuns and pastors started to seek the guidance of YAMADA Roshi.

By the time of his passing on 13 September 1989 as many as 24 Japanese and 21 non-Japanese disciples had finished the formal course of Zen training.


Books

Hekiganroku - Die Niederschrift vom blauen Fels - Die klassische Koansammlung mit neuen Teishos - 2 Bände
Yamada Kôun / Lengsfeld, Peter (Hg.)
Kösel-Verlag GmbH & Co., München, 2002

PDF: The Gateless Gate: The Classic Book of Zen Koans
Translated with commentary by Kōun Yamada
Wisdom Publications, Boston, 2004

 

Periodical

暁鐘 KYÔSHÔ [The Awakening Gong] Back numbers

 

Translation of Yamada Koun Roshi's Teisho
on the Hekiganroku (Blue Cliff Record)

Foreword of the Editor Preface of the Author
Hekiganroku01 Hekiganroku 02 Hekiganroku 03 Hekiganroku 04 Hekiganroku 05
Hekiganroku06 Hekiganroku 07 Hekiganroku 08 Hekiganroku 09 Hekiganroku 10
Hekiganroku11 Hekiganroku 12 Hekiganroku 13 Hekiganroku 14 Hekiganroku 15
Hekiganroku16 Hekiganroku 17 Hekiganroku 18 Hekiganroku 19 Hekiganroku 20
Hekiganroku21 Hekiganroku 22 Hekiganroku 23 Hekiganroku 24 Hekiganroku 25
Hekiganroku26 Hekiganroku 27 Hekiganroku 28 Hekiganroku 29 Hekiganroku 30
Hekiganroku31 Hekiganroku 32 Hekiganroku 33 Hekiganroku 34 Hekiganroku 35
Hekiganroku36 Hekiganroku 37 Hekiganroku 38 Hekiganroku 39 Hekiganroku 40
Hekiganroku41 Hekiganroku 42 Hekiganroku 43 Hekiganroku 44 Hekiganroku 45
Hekiganroku46 Hekiganroku 47 Hekiganroku 48 Hekiganroku 49 Hekiganroku 50
Hekiganroku51 Hekiganroku 52 Hekiganroku 53 Hekiganroku 54 Hekiganroku 55
Hekiganroku56 Hekiganroku 57 Hekiganroku 58 Hekiganroku 59 Hekiganroku 60
Hekiganroku61 Hekiganroku 62 Hekiganroku 63 Hekiganroku 64 Hekiganroku 65
Hekiganroku66 Hekiganroku 67 Hekiganroku 68 Hekiganroku 69 Hekiganroku 70
Hekiganroku71 Hekiganroku 72 Hekiganroku 73 Hekiganroku 74 Hekiganroku 75
Hekiganroku76 Hekiganroku 77 Hekiganroku 78 Hekiganroku 79 Hekiganroku 80
Hekiganroku81 Hekiganroku 82 Hekiganroku 83 Hekiganroku 84 Hekiganroku 85
Hekiganroku86 Hekiganroku 87 Hekiganroku 88 Hekiganroku 89 Hekiganroku 90
Hekiganroku91 Hekiganroku 92 Hekiganroku 93 Hekiganroku 94 Hekiganroku 95
Hekiganroku96 Hekiganroku 97 Hekiganroku 98 Hekiganroku 99 Hekiganroku 100

 

Translation of Yamada Koun Roshi's Teisho
on the Shoyoroku (Book of Equanimity)

Foreword of the Editor List of Financial Contributors
Shoyoroku 01 Shoyoroku 02 Shoyoroku 03 Shoyoroku 04 Shoyoroku 05
Shoyoroku 06 Shoyoroku 07 Shoyoroku 08 Shoyoroku 09 Shoyoroku 10
Shoyoroku 11 Shoyoroku 12 Shoyoroku 13 Shoyoroku 14 Shoyoroku 15
Shoyoroku 16 Shoyoroku 17 Shoyoroku 18 Shoyoroku 19 Shoyoroku 20
Shoyoroku 21 Shoyoroku 22 Shoyoroku 23 Shoyoroku 24 Shoyoroku 25
Shoyoroku 26 Shoyoroku 27 Shoyoroku 28 Shoyoroku 29 Shoyoroku 30
Shoyoroku 31 Shoyoroku 32 Shoyoroku 33 Shoyoroku 34 Shoyoroku 35
Shoyoroku 36 Shoyoroku 37 Shoyoroku 38 Shoyoroku 39 Shoyoroku 40
Shoyoroku 41 Shoyoroku 42 Shoyoroku 43 Shoyoroku 44 Shoyoroku 45
Shoyoroku 46 Shoyoroku 47 Shoyoroku 48 Shoyoroku 49 Shoyoroku 50
Shoyoroku 51 Shoyoroku 52 Shoyoroku 53 Shoyoroku 54 Shoyoroku 55
Shoyoroku 56 Shoyoroku 57 Shoyoroku 58 Shoyoroku 59 Shoyoroku 60
Shoyoroku 61 Shoyoroku 62 Shoyoroku 63 Shoyoroku 64 Shoyoroku 65
Shoyoroku 66 Shoyoroku 67 Shoyoroku 68 Shoyoroku 69 Shoyoroku 70
Shoyoroku 71 Shoyoroku 72 Shoyoroku 73 Shoyoroku 74 Shoyoroku 75
Shoyoroku 76 Shoyoroku 77 Shoyoroku 78 Shoyoroku 79 Shoyoroku 80
Shoyoroku 81 Shoyoroku 82 Shoyoroku 83 Shoyoroku 84 Shoyoroku 85
Shoyoroku 86 Shoyoroku 87 Shoyoroku 88 Shoyoroku 89 Shoyoroku 90
Shoyoroku 91 Shoyoroku 92 Shoyoroku 93 Shoyoroku 94 Shoyoroku 95
Shoyoroku 96 Shoyoroku 97 Shoyoroku 98 Shoyoroku 99 Shoyoroku 100