ZEN IRODALOM ZEN LITERATURE
« Zen főoldal
« vissza a Terebess Online nyitólapjára

無異元來 Wuyi Yuanlai (a.k.a Dayi 大艤 1575–1630) [博山 Boshan]
博山和尚參禪警語 Boshan heshang canchan jingyu

(Rōmaji:) Mui Genrai (a.k.a Daigi) [Hakusan]: Hakuzan osho sanzen keigo
(English:) Boshan
[“Mount Bo”]


Tartalom

Contents
 

Dhyana Master Wuyi Yuanlai
by Hsu Yun; Commentary by Hsuan Hua

示疑情发不起警語
PDF: Exhortations for Those Unable to Arouse the Doubt
Translated with commentary by Jeff Shore

示疑情发得起警语
PDF: Exhortations for Those Who Do Rouse the Doubt, Part 1, Part 2-3,
Translated with commentary by Jeff Shore

 

禪病警語 Chanbing jingyu

無異元來禪師廣錄 Wuyi Yuanlai chan shi guang lu
Record of the Chan Teacher Wuyi Yuanlai


博山和尚參禪驚語 PO-SHAN HO-SHANG TS'AN-CH'AN CHING-YU (Japanese, Hakuzan osho sanzen keigo), in two chuans, Dainihon Zokuzokyo, 2.17.5 (pp. 473b-486a). The admonitions to Zen students before and after they have attained satori, short commentaries on the words of old masters, and verses, by monk Wu-i Yuan-lai (Japanese, Mui Genrai) (1575-1630) of the Ts'ao-tung Tsung, compiled by the head monk (shou-tso) Ch'eng-cheng 成正首座 (Japanese, Josho shuso).

"Discourses of Master Po-Shan," translated by Garma C. C. Chang [Chang Chen-chi], in The Practice of Zen (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1959), pp. 66-79. Thirty-one passages taken from the above late Ming (1368-1644) work--about one-fourth of the complete text--and given in their original sequence.
More recently, Sheng Yen's Attaining the Way: A Guide to the Practice of Chan Buddhism (Boston: Shambhala, 2006) includes excerpts translated by Guogu (Jimmy Yu), pp. 19-22.

示疑情发不起警語
Exhortations for Those Unable to Arouse the Doubt
Great Doubt: Getting Stuck & Breaking Through the Real Koan; in: Jeff Shore: Zen Classics for the Modern World: Translations of Chinese Zen Poems & Prose with Contemporary Commentary, Diane Publishing Co. 2011, 138 p.

http://beingwithoutself.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/great_doubt.pdf

示疑情发得起警语
Exhortations for Those Who Do Rouse the Doubt
Jeff Shore: "The first four of his Exhortations for Those Who Do Rouse the Doubt. Here he shows what happens when the Great Doubt is aroused, and some of the problems that can occur. This can be a great help as your practice matures and comes to fruition."
http://beingwithoutself.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/exhortations-for-those-who-do-part-1.pdf

http://beingwithoutself.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/exhortations-for-those-who-do-part-2and3.pdf

 

 

 

 

69th Generational Patriarch Dhyana Master Wuyi Yuanlai
虛雲老和尚集 Composed by the Elder Master Hsu Yun
宣化上人講於一九八五年六月十三日 Commentary by the Venerable Master Hsuan Hua on June 13, 1985
Vajra Bodhi Sea, No. 306. November 1995.
http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/306/vbs306p011.htm

The Master was born to the family of Sha in Shu City. He studied under Dhyana Master Shouchang and investigated the topic of a place to hide away without a trace, whereupon he had an awakening.

Dhyana Master Chang said, “Ants are attracted by foul odors, and flies always head for stinking places. Does this have to do with the king or the minister?”

The Master replied, “It has to do with the minister.”

Dhyana Master Chang reproached him. Hearing the statue of the Dharma protecting spirit fall to the ground with a crash, he was suddenly enlightened. He composed a verse and submitted it, but Dhyana Master Chang refused to acknowledge it. One day he went to the toilet, saw someone climbing a tree, and had a great awakening. He went to see Dhyana Master Chang, who interrogated him. The Master answered each of the questions confidently. Dhyana Master Chang said, “Now you know that I have not been cheating you.” In the year of renyin , he became the Abbot at Boshan. Later he served as Abbot at Dongyan, Dayang, and Gushan . In the year of Jisi, he went to Tianjie in Jinling, where he sought instruction and practiced the Way for thirty years. Because he deeply respected the great Dharma, many eminent men drew near to him, but he did not lightly give his approval to anyone. He manifested the stillness at the age of fifty-eight in the year of gengwu during the reign of Chongzhen . A stupa was erected for him on the mountain.

This is the 69th generational patriarch, Dhyana Master Wuyi Yuanlai. His name Wuyi means “no different.” No different from what? He was no different from common people, and no different from the Buddhas. The mind, the Buddhas, and living beings are no different from one another. Yuanlai means “it was originally so.” The Master was born to the family of Sha in Shu City in the province of Anhui. His lay surname was Sha. His father was Sha He, and he had a brother named Sha Hai.

He studied under Dhyana Master Shouchang and investigated the meditation topic of a place to hide away without a trace, whereupon he had an awakening. He gained a little insight. Dhyana Master Chang engaged in verbal combat with him and said, “Ants are attracted by foul odors, and flies always head for stinking places.” Ants instinctively gather at foul-smelling places. Blue-bottle flies are bluish-green in color and may grow as large as a person's fingernail. They will fly to wherever there is a stench.

“Does this have to do with the king or the minister?”

The Master replied, “It has to do with the minister.” When someone asks a question like that, you shouldn't answer. If you answer, you fall into his trap. If you say it has to do with the king, he can say it has to do with the minister. If you say it's the minister's business, then he'll say it's the king's business. It's not fixed. He can make a reasonable argument for either side. No matter what you say, he can say the opposite and make you seem in the wrong. You wouldn't be able to make head or tail of the situation. That's how verbal sparring works. If you don't answer his question directly, but rather reply with something totally different, then you can get out of the dilemma. Dhyana Master Chang reproached him because he fell into the trap.

No matter who questions you, you don't have to answer right away. Your reply has to be flexible. Your questioner might want you to give a logical answer. Ha! Logic! Don't think of questions in Chan as being fixed. Whatever can be spoken has no real meaning. As soon as you say it, it's wrong. “Once you open your mouth, you've made a mistake. Once you give rise to a thought, you are off.” Then why did the Dhyana Master question him? Because he still had to resort to language in order to test his student. He wanted to see if he really understood, if he was an expert.

“Does this have to do with the king or the minister?” This question is like when those quack fortune-tellers say, “ Fu zai mu xian wang .” [Note: This ambiguous sentence can mean either “The father is alive and the mother has passed away” or “The father passes away before the mother.”]

Suppose a fortune-teller tells you that and you say, “Oh, my mother has passed away, and my father is no longer alive.”

“Of course, I told you that your father passed away before your mother,” he would say.

And if you say, “Actually, my mother is still alive, and my father has passed away.”

He would then say, “Of course, I told you clearly that your father passed away before your mother, and your mother is still alive.”

Therefore, when the Dhyana Master said, “Ants are attracted by foul odors, and flies always head for stinking places,” how did that have anything to do with the king or the minister? His question was completely groundless. I have only one comment: Nonsense!

 

Vajra Bodhi Sea, No. 307. December 1995
http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/307/vbs307p011.htm

From last issue:

Dhyana Master Wuyi Yuanlai studied under Dhyana Master Shouchang. Dhyana Master Chang engaged in verbal combat with him, saying, “Ants are attracted by foul odors, and flies always head for stinking places. Does this have to do with the king or the minister?”

He just made up this topic so he could have something to talk about, that's all. When the Master replied, “It has to do with the minister,” he got scolded. Hearing the statue of the Dharma protecting spirit fall to the ground with a crash, he was suddenly enlightened. Whether it was because the spirit no longer wanted to protect the Dharma or for some other reason, the statue fell to the ground, and he suddenly became nlightened. He composed a verse and submitted it, but Dhyana Master Chang refused to acknowledge it. He wasn't necessarily seeking for approval; he just wanted Dhyana Master Chang to take a look and see if he was right. However, the Dhyana Master refused to certify him. In fact, he totally ignored him.

One day he went to the toilet, saw someone climbing a tree, and had a great awakening. He was so anxious that he didn't know what to do or where to turn. Then he went to the toilet and saw a person climbing a tree. At first he thought it was a monkey, but a closer look revealed that it was a man. And so he had a sudden great awakening. He went to see Dhyana Master Chang, who interrogated him. Dhyana Master Shouchang cross-examined him, and the Master answered each of the questions confidently. He gave prompt answers to every question, without stopping to think or consider. His replies were righteous and full of confidence.

Dhyana Master Chang said, “Now you know that I have not been cheating you.” Dhyana Master Shouchang certified him and said, “Today you finally know that I haven't cheated you. Maybe you didn't understand that before. You know now what all those beatings and scoldings I gave you were for. I wasn't bullying you without reason.”

In the year of renyan, he became the Abbot at Boshan. Later he served as Abbot at Dongyan, Dayang, and Gushan monasteries. In the year of Jisi, he went to the capital, Jinling, where he sought instruction and practiced the Way for thirty years. He was there for more than thirty years. Because he deeply respected the great Dharma, many eminent men drew near to him, but he did not lightly give his approval to anyone. Many outstanding people went to study under him. However, he didn't casually bestow praise upon people.

He manifested the stillness at the age of fifty-eight in the year of gengwu during the reign of Chongzhen at the end of the Ming dynasty. A stupa was erected for him on the mountain. His pagoda was built on Bo Mountain.

A verse in praise says:

At a place where there were no tracks,
he suddenly tripped and fell.
As he wondered why someone was climbing a tree,
the bucket's bottom dropped off.
He won over the multitudes and seemed to be
Master Shao come again.
The Master's teaching was exalted;
in ten thousand years he stood out alone.

Commentary:

At a place where there were no tracks, he suddenly tripped and fell. “Fell” means he was scolded. When he replied that it was the minister's affair, that was equivalent to tripping and falling. As he wondered why someone was climbing a tree, the bucket's bottom dropped off. When he saw someone climbing up the tree, he got enlightened. The bucket refers to a bucket of black paint, which represents ignorance. Now the bucket has been broken; its bottom is gone.

He won over the multitudes and seemed to be Master Shao come again. It was as if National Master Shao had returned to the world. National Master Shao had probably been very eloquent, and so people admired his wisdom and oratorical skill. The Master's teaching was exalted. Dharma Master Yuanlai's Way-places were very strict, with very high standards. In ten thousand years he stood out alone. He set a distinctive course, which stood firm in the world.

Hsuan Hua's verse says:

Living beings, the mind, and the Buddhas are not different.
Seeing someone climb a tree, he came back to life.
Termites are instinctively drawn to foul odors.
Flies know only to head for stinking places.
The king, minister, assistant, and envoy trade places.
Old or young, noble or lowly, all must escape the net.
Great people who can transform themselves are sages.
Riding on his vows, he returned to save the Saha world.

Commentary:

Living beings, the mind, and the Buddhas are not different. This Dhyana Master was the same as living beings, the mind, and the Buddhas. Seeing someone climb a tree, he came back to life. He'd been like a dead person, investigating his Chan topic to the point that the heavens and earth became dark and north, south, east, west, the intermediate directions, and the zenith and nadir were all forgotten. Yet when he saw someone climbing a tree, he was suddenly enlightened; he came back to life.

Termites are instinctively drawn to foul odors. Termites, without having to be taught, know where to look for putrid things. Flies know only to head for stinking places. They always fly to foul-smelling areas. Who taught them to do that? Whose affair is it? Is it the affair of the king, the minister, the assistant, or the envoy? The king, minister, assistant, and envoy trade places. In Chinese medicine, the king, minister, assistant, and envoy assist each other; their roles are interchangeable.

Old or young, noble or lowly, all must escape the net. All people have to extricate themselves from the net of mundane defilements, whether they are honorable or lowly, old or young. Great people who can transform themselves are sages. All great wise advisors are sages come again. Riding on his vows, he returned to save the Saha world. Based on the power of his past vows, he returned to the Saha world to teach and transform living beings. He came looking for a few people who understood his heart, but perhaps he didn't find any and returned in disappointment.